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News & Events

Molecular Medicine in the War on Cancer: Success or Failure? "A virologist is among the luckiest of biologists because he can see into his chosen pet down to the details of all of its molecules." —David Baltimore, 1975 Accepting his Nobel Prize for his part in the identification of reverse transcriptase, David Baltimore reflected on the “luck” that virologists enjoyed in their ability to see into problems with molecular precision. Although this vision seems inspiring and compelling today,…
photo of display case containing coloring books from the Clinical Center by its 2nd floor cafeteria

New display cases have been installed around campus. Read a comic book about Joseph Goldberger’s work in pellagra in the early 20th century at the Building 1, 3rd floor case. Be amazed at the variety of Clinical Center patches near the Hospitality Desk on the 1st floor of the Clinical Center.  Think about the social context of coloring books from the Clinical Center by its 2nd floor cafeteria.  And salute a leading woman investigator, Dr. Margaret Pittman, in the Building 60 lobby.  Two cases are coming to the Vaccine Research Center, and one to Building 6.

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News and Events

History Blog

A Galaxy of Genius? The Enduring Dream of Controlling Human Heredity "What a galaxy of genius might we not create!" —Francis Galton, 1865 "What a galaxy of genius might we not create!" burbled Francis Galton in 1865, exuberant about his conception of a voluntary human breeding program, to be informed by Darwinism.  Subpar intelligence, he was convinced, lay at the root of poverty, promiscuity, disease, and antisocial behavior of all kinds.…
Barbara Faye Harkins - woman with short strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes smiling in formal portrait

Photo by Hank Grasso

We're sad to announce the death of our long-time archivist, Barbara Faye Harkins. After retiring in March 2020, she was greatly missed by our patrons. Now she will be greatly missed by us. 


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The NIH History Blog

Behind the Mask

An NIH Employee wearing a Mask to prevent COVID-19 Spread, standing in front of the NIH Clinical Center on Campus

COVID-19 has impacted the NIH community in many ways—from researching and providing information about the disease, to developing therapeutics and vaccines, to caring for patients in the Clinical Center, to re-configuring the ways we perform our jobs. To preserve this important time in NIH history, the Office of NIH History and Stetten Museum is seeking reflections, documents, photographs, and objects about how those at NIH have experienced the COVID-19 pandemic.

Behind the Mask




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