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News and Events

See Also: The NIH History Blog

A new set of neuroanatomy drawings by Santiago Ramón y Cajal was installed in Building 35.

Photo of the Cajal Exhibit, showing large image of Cajal and original illustrations on display along with 3d Printed tiles underneath

Current set of seven neuroanatomy drawings by Santiago Ramón y Cajal will remain on rotation in Building 35. 

The drawings date back to the turn of the last century when Santiago Ramón y Cajal shared the Nobel Prize (1906) with Camillo Golgi for their work on the structure of the nervous system.  We thank our partners at the Cajal Institute in Madrid, Spain for making this exhibit possible.  You can see the original drawings, or touch 3-D prints of enlarged drawing details, until September.



Santiago Ramón y Cajal Exhibit

New display cases in three buildings on campus

New display cases have been installed around campus. Read a comic book about Joseph Goldberger’s work in pellagra in the early 20th century at the Building 1, 3rd floor case. Be amazed at the variety of Clinical Center patches near the Hospitality Desk on the 1st floor of the Clinical Center.  Think about the social context of coloring books from the Clinical Center by its 2nd floor cafeteria.  And salute a leading woman investigator, Dr. Margaret Pittman, in the Building 60 lobby.  Two cases are coming to the Vaccine Research Center, and one to Building 6.

photo of display case containing coloring books from the Clinical Center by its 2nd floor cafeteria



Photo of display case showing a variety of Clinical Center patches near the Hospitality Desk on the 1st floor of the Clinical Center

Loan of Original Cajal Drawings on Exhibition in NIH’s Porter Neuroscience Center Extended

Photo of the Cajal Exhibit, showing large image of Cajal and original illustrations on display along with 3d Printed tiles underneath

Current set of seven neuroanatomy drawings by Santiago Ramón y Cajal will remain on rotation in Building 35. 

The drawings date back to the turn of the last century when Santiago Ramón y Cajal shared the Nobel Prize (1906) with Camillo Golgi for their work on the structure of the nervous system.  We thank our partners at the Cajal Institute in Madrid, Spain for making this exhibit possible.  You can see the original drawings, or touch 3-D prints of enlarged drawing details, until September.


Santiago Ramón y Cajal Exhibit  

Michael Potter Exhibit Launched

U.S. National Library of Medicine Photograph by Ernie Branson The Office of NIH History and Stetten Museum opened twin historical exhibits in the Clinical Center in May honoring two NIH greats: Dr. Christian Anfinsen, who shared the 1972 Nobel Prize in chemistry; and Dr. Michael Potter, winner of a 1984 Lasker Award. Anfinsen and Potter began their careers at NIH in the 1950s, when molecular biology and genetics were new fields. They expanded both fields by asking questions that led to deeper understanding of basic biological functions. Their commitment to science influenced their personal lives as well.