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Work in Progress (WIPS) Seminars

These seminars were given by Office of NIH History and Stetten Museum Fellows, and sometimes by invited guests, about their research. They are not published papers.

2012/2013

10/16/12
Pedigrees, Populations, and Politics: Conflicts Over Hereditary Disease in Britain Before the First World War
Judith Friedman, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

11/13/12
Stamping the Tramp: Newspapers and the Social Diffusion of Stigma toward the Undomiciled Poor in the United States, 1870-1929 
Marian Moser Jones, Family Science Department, University of Maryland, College Park

12/11/12
Above the Law: Federal Efforts to Prevent Substance Abuse
Grischa Metlay, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

01/22/13
Imitation and Innovation: A Brief History of Me-too Drugs 
Jeremy Greene, Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

02/26/13
Traversing the Orthodox-Unorthodox Divide: The Early History of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, 1948-1991
Eric Boyle, National Museum of Health and Medicine

03/26/13
Curative Action: Joseph J. Kinyoun and the Diphtheria Antitoxin
Eva Åhrén, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

04/16/13
Academic Medicine's Changing Social Contract:  From Medical Center to Health Sciences Center at the University of Oklahoma, 1950-1970
Sejal Patel, MITRE Corporation

05/07/13
Before Survivorship: Postoperative recovery and cancer in the 1950s
David Cantor, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

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2011/2012

WORK IN PROGRESS SEMINARS (WIPS)

10/25/11
"Dr. Burkitt, I presume?": Creating an African lymphoma in Uganda 1950-1970
Marissa Mika, Department of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
Building 49, Room 1A51/1A59

11/08/11
Tempest in The Forbidden City: Health Disparities and the 1926 Florida Hurricane 
Marian Moser Jones, Family Science Department, University of Maryland, College Park
Building 45, Room J

11/22/11
Federalizing Expert Approaches to Alcohol and Drug Problems
Grischa Metlay, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 49, Room 1A51/1A59

12/06/11
Man the Hunter, Man the Hunted: Masculinity, Violence and the Animal Inside
Erika Milam, Department of History, University of Maryland, College Park
Building 49, Room 1A51/1A59

12/20/11
Controversy, Mistrust, Even Witchcraft: The Failure of Cancer Therapy with Neutrons
Gerald Kutcher, Department of History, Binghamton University
Building 45, Room J

01/17/12
Deamonte's Epidemic and the Perils of Uncertain Science in Modern America
Richard M. Mizelle, Department of History, Florida State University
Building 45, Room J

01/31/12
Transparent Women and Watchful Grasshoppers: Reflections on the Life Sciences in Late 20th-century American Museums
Karen A. Rader, Department of History, Virginia Commonwealth University
Building 45, Room J

02/14/12
From Degeneration to Anticipation: The Reframing of a Hereditarian Concept
Judith Friedman, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 31/6C, Room 7

02/28/12
Idiosyncrasy in the Midst of Universals: Coronary Heart Disease Research in the 1960s
Sejal Patel, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room J

03/13/12
Denied their “Pharmaceutical Rights”? The Federal Government and Pediatric Drug Policy, 1938-1979
Cynthia Connolly, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Building 31/6C, Room 10

03/27/12
Science and Sanitation: Microbiology and Public Health Research at the Hygienic Laboratory of the Marine Health Service, 1887-1899
Eva Åhrén, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 60, Lecture Hall & Chapel

04/10/12
Pharmacology and Folklore: Arsenic Eaters and Tolerance to Poison
John Parascandola, Independent Scholar 
Building 60, Room 156

04/24/12
Random Enough to be Predictable?  The NIH and the Historical Evolution of Randomized Controlled Trials
Laura E. Bothwell, Columbia University
Building 60, Room B1A199C (Rathskeller)

05/08/12
The Trajectory of Diet Pills in America, from Marmola to Fen-Phen and Beyond
John P. Swann, History Office, Food and Drug Administration
Building 60, Room 156

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2010/2011

WORK IN PROGRESS SEMINARS (WIPS)

10/19/10
Doing Global Health: A New Scramble for Africa?
Johanna Crane, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room J

11/02/10
Medicine's Upstart Younger Brother: Thomas Turner and Basic Science Research in Public Health at John Hopkins, 1940-1960
Karen Kruse Thomas, Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
Building 45, Room H

11/16/10
Scientific Control of Violence or the Return of the Lobotomy? The Psychosurgery Debate of the 1970s
Brian Casey, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room J

11/30/10
Refuting the Concept of Anticipation in Hereditary Disease (1945-1970) 
Judith Friedman, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

12/14/10
Did Researchers Create the Homeless? Investigating Early Homelessness Research at the ADAMHA Institutes
Marian Moser Jones, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

01/11/11
The Disappearance of Particles and Public: Current U.S. Policy and its Challenges on Regulating Nanoproducts 
Sharon Ku, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H 

01/25/11
Critics of the Cancer Establishment and the Demise of the Virus Cancer Program in the 1970s 
Doogab Yi, Office of History, National Institutes of Health 
Building 45, Room H

02/08/11
The Politics of Instrumentalism: Instituting Alcohol and Drug Programs in the Public Health Service, 1970-1980
Grischa Metlay, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

02/22/11
The Architecture of Healing: Redesigning Medicine at the Stony Brook and McMaster University Health Sciences Centers
Stuart W. Leslie, History of Science and Technology, Johns Hopkins University
Building 45, Room H

03/08/11
White Mice?  The History of Radioactive Waste, Plutonium, and Human Subjects in the US and USSR, 1944-1986
Kate Brown, Department of History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Building 49, Room 1A51/A59

03/22/11
The Science and Politics of CAM at the NIH: From Unconventional Medical Practices to Integrative Medicine
Eric Boyle, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

04/05/11
Meeting the Demands of the Times? The Medical Museums at the Karolinska Institute 1860-1910
Eva Åhrén, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 31/6C, Room 8

04/19/11
Transparent Women and Watchful Grasshoppers: Reflections on the Life Sciences in Late 20th-century American Museums
Karen A. Rader, Department of History, Virginia Commonwealth University
Building 45, Room H

05/03/11
When Uncle Sam Welcomed Ronald McDonald: The Small Business Administration and Inner-City Fast Food Franchises
Chin Jou, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

05/17/11
A Social History of Biomedical Truth:  The Roseto Study, Community Health, and Study Designs
Sejal Patel, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room H

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2009/2010

WORK IN PROGRESS SEMINARS (WIPS)

10/06/09                
Translational Research: Of What? By Whom? For What Purposes?
Robert Martensen, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

10/20/09
The Politicization of Biomedicine: The NIH in the Post-Shannon Years
Buhm Soon Park, School of Humanities & Social Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

10/29/09
A Social Autopsy of the TGN1412 Clinical Trial: Northwick Park, Research Ethics Committees and the Normalisation of Deviance
Adam Hedgecoe, Associate Director, ESRC Centre for Economic and Social Aspects of Genomics (Cesagen), Cardiff University

Note: This seminar is on a different day (Thursday) and in different location to other seminars (Building 10, CRC Conference Room 3-1608)

11/03/09
The Institutionalization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the NIH 
Eric Boyle, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Conference Room B

11/17/09
The Organized Search for the Oncogene
Doogab Yi, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room 3AS13A

12/01/09                
The Gospel of Simplicity and Nutrition Writers’ Responses to Modern Foodways 
Chin Jou, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Conference Room C1/C2

12/15/09 
Cholesterol, Atherosclerosis, and Etiological Uncertainty in Twentieth-Century American Medicine
Todd Olszewski, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Conference Room C1/C2

01/12/10
Not Guilty by Reason of Neuroscience: Roper v. Simmons and the Influence of Recent Neuroscientific Discoveries on Jurisprudence
Brian Casey, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Conference Room C1/C2

01/26/10
“Ethics in situ,” Chapter 4 of a book manuscript, Behind Closed Doors: The Genesis and Development of IRBs, forthcoming
Laura Stark, Office of History, National Institutes of Health and Wesleyan University
Building 45, Conference Room B

02/23/10
Who is the Nanobiologist? Discipline and Disciplinary Identity in the Collaboration of the Nanodrug Characterization 
Sharon Ku, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room 3AS13A

03/09/10
Confronting that Elephant in the Room:  Addressing the National Institutes of Health in the History of American Health Research
Sejal Patel, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room G1/G2

03/23/10
The Spectacular Failure of Centoxin and How it Changed Corporate Biotechnology and the FDA 
Shera A. Moxley, Carnegie Mellon University
Building 45, Room 3AS13A

03/31/10 (NOTE CHANGE OF DATE)
The Sentimental World Picture: Humanitarianism and the Lost Films of the American Red Cross
Jennifer Horne, Department of Media Studies, The Catholic University of America
Building 45, Conference Room B

04/06/10                
The “Moment of Recovery” in Twentieth Century American Cancer Campaigns
David Cantor, Office of History, National Institutes of Health
Building 45, Room 3AS13A

04/20/10                
Colonialism and Disease Control in Prewar Hong Kong
Ka-che Yip, Department of History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Building 45, Conference Room B 

05/18/10                
Do Signals Have Politics? Inscribing Abilities in Cochlear Implants
Mara Mills, Penn Humanities Forum, University of Pennsylvania
Building 50, Room 1328/1334

06/08/10 (NOTE CHANGE OF DATE AND LOCATION)               
"Keeping Well": Using History for Public Health Education in Mid-Twentieth Century America
Graham Mooney, Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
Building 50, Room 1328/1344

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2008/2009

WORK IN PROGRESS SEMINARS (WIPS)

05/05/09
Fitness Begins in the High Chair: The President’s Council on Youth Fitness and Cold War Exercise Promotion
Shelly McKenzie, George Washington University

04/21/09
Human Rights and the Professionalization of Public Health
Sokhieng Au, Johns Hopkins University

03/10/09
“A Record of Historical Fact” Transsexuality, Retrospective Diagnosis, and the Ethics of History or Joking in the Archive with Carolyn Steedman
Dan O’Connor, Johns Hopkins University

12/16/08
The Cinema of the Future: Visions of the Medium as Modern Educator, 1895-1910
Oliver Gaycken, Temple University

12/09/08
Behind Closed Doors
Laura Stark, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

11/18/08
Who Owns What? Private Ownership and the Public Interest in the Recombinant DNA Technology in the 1970s
Doogab Yi, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

11/04/08
Mapping and Remapping the Boundaries Between Orthodox and Unorthodox Medicine
Eric W. Boyle, Office of NIH History, National Institutes of Health

10/28/08
Travelling Facts about Crowded Rats: Rodent Experimentation and the Human Sciences
Edmund Ramsden, University of Exeter

10/21/08
Introduction to Cholesterol: A Scientific, Medical, and Social History, 1908-1962
Todd M. Olszewski, Office of History, National Institutes of Health

09/30/08
Solving the Puzzle of Russian Tick-Borne Encephalitis: Science, Discovery, and History in the Soviet Far East, 1932-1958 and Beyond
Lisa K. Walker, Independent Scholar

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