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Fluorescence to the Rescue | Move to the NIH | Anything Glows | AMINCO Steps In | Nobel Prize Winner | Fluorescence News
image of molecule Anything Glows (1950-1955)
 


NHI scientists did not yet know at which wavelengths many biological compounds would fluoresce. If the new instrument could emit light at wavelengths throughout the ultraviolet range, scientists might be able to excite fluorescence in compounds that could have interesting research applications. The question was, if they learned more about fluorescence, would this be useful in a practical as well as theoretical sense?

Working with others at NHI, Dr. Bowman developed the first prototype of his spectrophotofluorometer in 1955. Unlike previous fluorometers, this new instrument was able to vary the wavelength of exciting light as well as measure the intensity and wavelength of the emitted fluorescent light. This instrument could be used to survey biological compounds and help scientists figure out new ways to use fluorescence to study the body.


SPF project description sheet

NIH project description sheet for the"development of Spectrophotofluorometry and its application to biological measurements," 1955


If they learned more about fluorescence, would this be useful in a practical as well as theoretical sense?


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