Marian Moser Jones, Ph.D.

Marian Moser JonesMarian Moser Jones studies the historical evolution of the American public-private welfare state and the institutionalization of benevolence. Her research has focused on two subjects, the American Red Cross and homelessness. Jones’ first book, The American Red Cross, from Clara Barton to the New Deal, is slated to be published in 2012 by Johns Hopkins University Press. The book examines how this leading American voluntary organization operationalized its guiding ideals, humanity and neutrality, in its work related to disasters and wars.

As a Stetten fellow affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Jones researched the federal government’s response to the homelessness crisis that emerged in the late 1970s. In particular, she examined how NIDA, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and the National Institute of Mental Health developed research programs and methodologies to study the “new” homeless population in the U.S. and how these studies shaped policy responses to this crisis. Jones is also beginning research on how the homeless services sector is being affected by the recent recession and the return of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.

An Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Health in the Department of Family Science, Jones teaches courses on the Human Services Sector and Public Health. She has previously served as an Assistant Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Science, Technology and Society Program. Jones received her Ph.D. and M.P.H. degrees in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, and her A.B. from Harvard College. Before beginning her graduate studies, Jones worked as a journalist, most recently serving as Editorial Director at GenomeWeb, an online life sciences news service in New York City.

Selected Publications:

The American Red Cross, from Clara Barton to the New Deal (Johns Hopkins Press, forthcoming). 

top of page

Office of History and Stetten Museum| Bldg 60 | Suite 230 | National Institutes of Health | Bethesda, MD 20814-1460
Phone: 301.496.6610 | Email: history@nih.gov
Freedom of Information Act

Last updated: 28 March 2012
First published: 2 February 2005
Permanence level
Permanent: Dynamic Content