Johanna Crane, Ph.D.

Johanna CraneDr. Johanna Crane is an assistant professor in Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at the University of Washington-Bothell.  Her research interests include science and power, global health, and the intersections between science studies and critical medical anthropology.  Her current book project (tentatively titled The Science of Inequality: AIDS, Africa, and the Rise of American Global Health) offers a critical ethnography of AIDS expertise in the U.S. and Uganda, and describes the uncomfortable mix of preventable suffering and scientific productivity that characterizes contemporary global health science.   Her teaching interests include global health, science and technology studies, medical anthropology, bioethics, and urban ethnography.

Dr. Crane earned her Ph.D. from the UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Program in Medical Anthropology in 2007, and her M.A. in Anthropology from San Francisco State University in 1999.  She completed postdoctoral fellowships in the Dept. of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University, the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Office of History at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Selected Publications:

“Scrambling for Africa? Universities and Global Health,” Lancet, 2011, 377(9775): 1388-1390, April (published online Nov 2010).

 “Viral Cartographies: Mapping the Molecular Politics of Global HIV,” BioSocieties 2011, 6(2): 142-166.

 “Unequal Partners: AIDS, Academia, and the Rise of Global Health,” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilization, 2010, 3(3): 78-97.

 “Adverse Events and Placebo Effects: African Scientists, HIV, and Ethics in the ‘Global Health’ Sciences,” Social Studies of Science, 2010, 40(6): 843-870.

(co authored with) A. Kawuma, J.H. Oyugi, J.T. Byakika, A. Moss, P. Bourgois, and D.R. Bangsberg, “The Price of Adherence: Qualitative Findings from HIV-Positive Individuals Purchasing Fixed-Dose Combination Generic HIV Therapy in Kampala, Uganda.” AIDS and Behavior, 2010, 10(4): 437-442.

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Last updated: 28 March 2012
First published: 2 February 2005
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