David Cantor, Ph.D.

David CantorDavid Cantor is a historian in the Office of History at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. His scholarly work focuses on the history of medicine in the twentieth-century, most recently the histories of cancer, stress and medical film. He is series editor (edited collections) of Studies for the Society of the Social History of Medicine published by Pickering and Chatto. 

Educated at the University of Lancaster, U.K. ( Ph.D.), Cantor joined the Office in 2007 after holding positions at several universities in the U.K., and at The Johns Hopkins University, the National Library of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute in the U.S.A.

 

 

Select PUBLICATIONS

Books

(Co-editor) Stress, Shock, and Adaptation in the Twentieth Century (Co-edited with Edmund Ramsden) Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2014.

(Co-editor) Meat, Medicine, and Human Health in the Twentieth Century (co-edited with Christian Bonah and Matthias Dörries), London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010.

(Editor) Cancer in the Twentieth Century, Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

(Editor) Reinventing Hippocrates, Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2002

Articles

The Reward of Courage (1921). A Rediscovered Cancer Film of the Silent Era, Bethesda: National Library of Medicine, 2013. View the film

“Our Shapeshifting Companion,” (Essay review of Siddhartha Mukherjee, The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, Fourth Estate, 2011), London Review of Books, Vol. 35, No. 5, 7th March 2013, pp. 25-26.

“Between Prevention and Therapy: Gio Batta Gori and the National Cancer Institute’s Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme, 1974-1978,” Medical History, 56, 4, October 2012, pp. 531-561.

“Le National Cancer Institute: problème d’une intervention fédérale contre le cancer dans l’Amérique du début du XXe siècle,” in Didier Foucault (ed.), Lutter contre le cancer (1740-1960), Toulouse: Éditions Privat, 2012, pp. 329-358.

“Confused Messages:  Meat, Civilization, and Cancer Education in the Early Twentieth Century,” in David Cantor, Christian Bonah and Matthias Dörries (eds.) Meat, Medicine, and Human Health in the Twentieth Century, London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010, pp.111-126.

(with Christian Bonah), “Meat, Medicine, and Human Health in the Twentieth Century,” in David Cantor, Christian Bonah and Matthias Dörries (eds.) Meat, Medicine, and Human Health in the Twentieth Century, London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010, pp. 1-31.

“Choosing to Live: Cancer Education, Movies, and the Conversion Narrative in America, 1921-1960,”Literature and Medicine 28 (2) Fall 2009, pp. 278–332.

“Radium and the Origins of the National Cancer Institute,” in Caroline Hannaway (ed.), Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century: Practices, Policies, and Politics, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2008, pp. 95-146.

“Cancer Control and Prevention in the Twentieth Century,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 81, (1) Spring 2007, pp. 1-38. (PDF - 432KB)

“Uncertain Enthusiasm: The American Cancer Society, Public Education, and the Problems of the Movie, 1921-1960,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 81, (1) Spring 2007, pp. 39-69.

“A Word from Your Sponsor?” Times Higher Education Supplement, No. 1782, 23rd February 2007, pp.16-17.

“The Politics of Commissioned Histories (Revisited),” in Ronald E. Doel and Thomas Söderqvist (eds.), The Historiography of Recent Science, Medicine, and Technology. Writing Recent Science, London and New York: Routledge, 2006, pp.45-66.

“The Frustrations of Families: Henry Lynch, Heredity, and Cancer Control, 1962-1975,” Medical History, 50, (3), July 2006, pp. 279-302.

“Cancer, Quackery and the Vernacular Meanings of Hope in 1950s America,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 61, (3) July 2006, pp.324-368.

“Between Galen, Geddes and the Gael: Arthur Brock, Modernity and Medical Humanism in Early-Twentieth-Century Scotland,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 60, (1) January 2005, pp.1-41.

Essay review of Owsei Temkin,On Second Thought” And Other Essays in the History of Medicine and Science, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002, in Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, 25, (2), April 2004, pp.157-164.

“Cancer,” in Dominique Lecourt, François Delaporte, Patrice Pinell, Christiane Sinding, (eds.), Dictionnaire de la Pensée Médicale, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2004, pp.195-201.

“Representing 'The Public': Medicine, Charity and Emotion in Twentieth-Century Britain,” in Steve Sturdy (ed.), Medicine, Health and the Public Sphere in Britain, 1600-2000, London and New York: Routledge, 2002, pp.145-168.

“The Uses and Meanings of Hippocrates,” in David Cantor (ed.), Reinventing Hippocrates, Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2002, pp.1-18.

“The NAME and the WORD: Neo-Hippocratism and Language in Interwar Britain,” in David Cantor (ed.), Reinventing Hippocrates, Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2002, pp.280-301.

 

Contact Details:
David Cantor, Ph.D. | Office of NIH History
Bldg 45, Room 3AN38, MSC 6330
National Institutes of Health | Bethesda, MD 20892-6330 U.S.A.
Phone: 301.402.8915 (Direct) | 301.496.6610 (Office)
Fax: 301.402.1434
Email: cantord@mail.nih.gov

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Office of History and Stetten Museum | Bldg 60 | Suite 230 | National Institutes of Health | Bethesda, MD 20814-1460
Phone: 301.496.6610 | Email: history@nih.gov
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Last updated: 12 June 2014
First published: 2 February 2005
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